Thinking about Extended School Year?

Extended School Year or ESY refers to special education and related services that are provided to eligible students beyond the normal school year, based on the student’s IEP (Individualized Education Program).  Services  are based on each child’s unique needs, so they range widely in terms of the type of service and how it is delivered.  During the development of each new IEP the IEP team must decide if the student is, or is not eligible for ESY services.  In some cases, the team will note that ESY is “under consideration” and a future date will be set for the team to come back together and make a final decision.  This gives the team time to collect data or information about the student’s performance to help them determine eligibility for ESY.

Some of the key things for the IEP team to consider are:

  • Whether the student regresses, or slides backward, during long breaks from instruction, and takes an unusually long time to relearn lost skills, or
  • Whether there is a risk that a long break will erase most of the gain that the student made during the regular school,or
  • Whether the student is showing that they are beginning to learn a critical skill, and the “window of opportunity” might be lost if there are long breaks from instruction.

The great majority of students do not qualify for ESY services.  In many cases, however, the team ends up checking “No” on the IEP because they simply do not have enough information to establish that the student needs ESY services.

It’s probably too late to address ESY for the summer of 2012, but it’s not too late to start gathering information and data that the IEP team can consider at the next annual review.  Save a few samples of your child’s school work to show what they were able to do at the end of the 2011-2012 school year.  Keep progress reports, report cards, behavior reports, communication log, correspondence, assessment results, videos….basically anything that will provide documentation of your child’s functioning in the areas of concern.

When your child returns to school, find out what kind of assessments will be done.  If additional skills need to be measured, ask to have some assessments conducted in those areas.  If there are significant concerns about behavior, try to get next year’s teacher to make  written reports to you about how your child’s behavior has been each day.  Whether the teacher makes a note in the child’s assignment book, or completes a printed check sheet of some sort, this will provide information about your child’s performance over time, so that any patterns can be identified (ex. he/she has more behavioral difficulties after long weekends, winter and spring breaks).

It’s okay to tell the teacher(s) that you want to make sure that enough data is collected during the year to give the IEP team what it needs to make the right decision about Extended School Year services.  Make notes about things that you observe and comments that are made to you.  Hold onto (or copy) some of the school work and tests that come home.  Hopefully what you will see is your child making steady progress.  But you will be better prepared, just in case…

Posted on June 5, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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