Blog Archives

Great Back-to-School Checklist

The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) has created a great Back-to-School Checklist for families. It contains some tips that apply to parents or caregivers of all children. There is also a series of tips especially for parents/caregivers of children who have health concerns.

Even though school has started, it’s never too late for a good idea. Check it out!

Back-to-School Family Checklist

Tools to help others know your child better

One of the most basic advocacy tips for parents is to make contact with your child’s teachers at the beginning of the school year, or anytime new teachers or service providers become involved. One purpose for this initial contact is to introduce yourself, exchange information about how each of you prefers to be contacted, and to establish a good working relationship long before there are problems to tackle. Another important purpose for this first contact is to share some vital information about your child, such as the fact that the child has a disability and an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Section 504 Accommodation Plan. Sometimes classroom teachers are not made aware of these things right away.

Beyond the nuts and bolts of diagnoses, accommodations, modifications, special education services and such, it is important to make sure that the people who will be working with your child have a sense of who that child is as an individual, unique human being. Some parents simply write a letter, others have created brochures and PowerPoint presentations. ECAC has developed a couple of tools that make it easy for parents to share important information about their child with others.

ECAC Painting the Big Picture 1 Painting the Big Picture This is a worksheet that offers a way to quickly share information about things such as your child’s likes, dislikes, strengths, successes, challenges, as well as your dreams and visions for your child’s future. In each section there is also a place to share tips and successful strategies (what works) that help your child overcome difficulties and build relationships with others. There is even a place to capture Other Helpful Information that doesn’t fit anywhere else. This could include information about special healthcare needs, dietary restrictions, fears, unusual responses and things that can be done to calm your child when he/she becomes upset. Having a written document to refer back to will give teachers and others a big head start as they get to know your child!

ECAC_StudentSnapshot2014 1 ECAC’s Student Snapshot serves the same basic purpose as Painting the Big Picture, but it mainly focuses on the most important information that will make the biggest difference for your child. Areas of concern could include things like emotions, communication, sensory issues, medical conditions, academic needs, etc.  In addition to teachers and other school staff, ECAC’s Student Snapshot can be shared with childcare providers, summer camp staff, Sunday School teachers, Scout leaders, etc. It provides a description of something that the adult may notice, an explanation of what that probably means, along a suggestion or two. Statements could go something like this:

When you see that I’m not raising my hand to answer questions, I’m probably not confident that my answer would be correct and I don’t want to embarrass myself. You can help by only calling on me when I do raise my hand.

If I ask to use the bathroom in the middle of an activity, it means that I cannot wait until the next break. You can help by letting me go immediately so that I do not have an accident.

If I’ve been having problems with asthma lately and I seem unusually hyperactive, it may be a reaction to the medicine that helps me breathe better. Please try to be patient and find ways to keep me occupied so that I don’t drive you crazy.

Teachers can also share these tools with parents so that they can get to know their students more quickly. It would also send a clear message to parents that you care about their child. Regardless of who reaches out first, sharing important information will help the people in a child’s life work together as a team. This will give the child a much better chance to have a successful experience.

Second Semester, Second Chance

It’s report card time and time to see how the first half of the school year went. If your child’s report card reflects solid grades and good work habits, some sort of celebration is in order. One of my co-workers learned that her daughter earned a 96 in an advanced math class. She offered to buy ice cream, but her daughter wanted her bedroom painted instead.  Fair enough!

If, on the other hand, you were disappointed in your child’s progress or performance, there is still time to turn things around. You and your child can press the reset button by looking for ways to improve on things that you have been doing. Think about changes that can be made on many possible  levels.

  • If your child has poor sleeping habits, try establishing a bed-time routine that gradually steps down the amount of activity and stimulation in the household. A well-rested brain functions better.
  • If your child wastes time in the evening and then stays up late doing homework, set a firm cutoff time to stop working, shut down the computer and place everything in the backpack (which will “live” in a designated spot in another room).  Then start winding things down toward bedtime. Provide prompts and reminders earlier in the evening to serve as fair warning.                            It may take a couple of incomplete assignments or disappointing test grades to get the real message across. Don’t cave in though, because it is essential that students develop good work habits, including learning how to effectively manage their time, if they are going to be able to sustain their success throughout the school and college years. Showing up for class exhausted and inattentive will eventually take its toll. Throwing together projects at the last minute and cramming for tests will also lead to poorer quality results that your child will take less pride in. I know this first-hand from my experience as person who went through school with undiagnosed ADHD.
  • If your child is overwhelmed by an over-packed schedule that doesn’t leave enough time for schoolwork and “down time,” consider taking a break from one of the activities.  Unless your child is talented enough that a sport or cheerleading scholarship is a real possibility, they might be better off burning the candle from only one end. Keep the activities that give them joy, and  set aside those that are on the schedule just because of habit.
  • If your child has an IEP or Section 504 accommodation plan, review it to see if it adequately addresses her current needs. It might be time to update the accommodations and supports to match performance expectations that tend to get higher each year. Get your child’s input so that any changes are going to be ones that they think will be helpful and will cooperate with.
  • Re-establish lines of communication with teachers and other school staff. If your child will have different classes for the 2nd semester, there may be new teachers who may not be aware of his special needs or the fact that you are a concerned and involved parent who expects to be considered an equal part of your child’s educational team. Set a positive tone and let them know that you are looking for this semester to be better than the last one.
  • Look for any other areas where a change for the better might be possible: diet and nutrition, general health and well-being, mental health, organization (personal and/or household), social skills, etc.  Consult with trusted friends, family and professionals to see if they have any suggestions.

If things are going great, keep doing what you are doing.  If not, try something different that might lead to better results. Remember, there can be no growth without change!

FAQ: Can I pick my child’s teacher?

questions-and-answersFAQ:  Do I have a right to choose my child’s teacher?

Answer:  As a general rule, parents do not have the right to select the school staff who will be working with their child.  However, there may be ways that parents can influence that decision.

This question is usually asked by parents of children in elementary school.  The situation in middle and high schools are complicated by scheduling limitations (only so many sections of a particular course are offered at any given point in time), the requirement that secondary teachers are highly qualified in the content area in order to teach a core subject, and the practice of organizing middle school students and teachers into “teams”.

Elementary school principals are typically  responsible for assigning students to specific teachers.  It is expected that this process is not done randomly.  Principals have lots of information available to them to help make that decision.  They can consider student  factors such as age, gender, skill levels, discipline history as well as teacher input and recommendations.  Teacher characteristics, experience and training are also usually taken into consideration.

Once classroom assignment decisions have been made, most principals do not want to deal with a lot of parents who are unhappy that their child did not get assigned to the most popular teacher at that grade.  They often worry that the floodgates will open if they give in to a parent’s request to add “just one more child” to Miss Suzie’s class.  This is understandable.  The principal is trying to make sure that all teachers are valued and seen as competent, and that there is an equitable (not necessarily equal) distribution of the student population.  A parent who pushes the issue too hard can find themselves on the losing end of a power struggle.

So, what can you do to help get your child assigned to a teacher that will be a good match?  Or at least avoid a worst-case scenario?  Some kids can go with the flow and will be fine with almost any teacher.  For that child, it will probably be safe to let things occur without any interference.  However, if you have one of those children who is not going to be okay in every situation, or will not do well with every teaching style, it is best to be proactive.  It is always easier to influence a decision before it’s made, than to change it after the fact.

In late spring, try to set up a face-to-face meeting with the principal to talk about your child and his educational needs.  Share information about what makes your child unique.  Discuss relevant personality traits, past experiences, learning style and disability-related issues that you would like the principal to think about when they are deciding who to assign as your child’s next teacher.  You can talk about classroom environment and teacher traits that will allow your child to function at her best.  You can also mention past situations that did not work well for your child.  Be careful to not put down any past teachers!  Instead, you can talk about teaching styles, amount of classroom structure, authoritarian versus nurturing approaches, physical environment requirements, health and safety needs and any special issues regarding interaction with other students.

Unless the principal is new to that school, they should know their staff well enough to know which teachers are a good match for your child and which will likely lead to disaster.  Leave a written summary of the key points that you want the principal to think about.  The actually classroom assignments may not be made until weeks or months after your meeting, and your document can be a much-needed reminder of the things you talked about.  If you learn that the decision will not be made until the end of summer, consider sending a greeting (by phone or email) expressing that you and your child are looking forward to the new school year, and thanking the principal for taking the time to meet with you earlier to talk about your child.  If you send an email, it might not be a bad idea to attach another copy of the reminder document.  Play that one by ear though, and skip the attachment if you think that the principal might consider it too pushy.

 

Remember, the goal is to get a good situation for your child, not for the principal to feel like you are trying to tell them how to do their job.  Diplomacy and effective advocacy are often about knowing when, how, and how hard to push.

It’s time for a mid-year school check up

We are just about at the halfway point in the school year.  Report cards will be coming home.  If your child receives special education services you should also get a report on his/her progress on their IEP goals.  This is a great opportunity to think about how things are going and whether or not some changes need to be made.  Ideally, we would all like to have a happy, socially-successful child who is learning and developing at or above the expected rate in all areas.  If that describes your child, you should give a word of thanks to all who have helped make this happen!

However,check-up-bottom not everyone is going to be so fortunate.  If there are things that concern you about your child’s education, there is still time to take actions that could help.

If your child’s grades are lower than you think they should be, try to get to the root of the problem.  Is your child having difficulty learning the material being taught? Is he doing poorly on tests even though he seems to understand the work?  Is she doing fine on tests, but has a low grade average because of zeros for several school assignments that were never completed or turned in?  Has your child missed a lot of instruction because of disciplinary actions that have taken him out of the classroom too many times?

Even if the grades are okay, there may be other reasons to be concerned.  The grades may seem to be inconsistent with what you see when your child is doing home work.  The progress on IEP goals may be moving much slower than expected.  Instructional assessments may show that the gap between your child’s skills and the achievement standard for his grade is getting wider instead of more narrow.  Is your child saying, or showing, that she does not want to go to school?  Are you getting more reports about problem behavior at school?

If you do see any red flags, the first action to take is to try to understand what is working and exactly where there may be some problems.  Talk to your child and your child’s teacher(s).  Ask what you can do at home to help your child be more successful.  Work with the teacher(s), other school staff, and the IEP team as appropriate to come up with solutions to any problems that are identified.  Make adjustments in terms of instruction, materials, strategies, accommodations, services, supports, environment…whatever makes sense for your child at this time.  Keep an eye on things to see if there is improvement or a need to try something else.

Your child is the winner when his educational team is working together toward the same goal!winner

Who comes to IEP meetings?

The Individualized Education Program (IEP) that describes special education services and supports for a qualifying student with a disability is created by an IEP Team that is defined by federal law.  The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) lists the core membership of an IEP team as including the parent, a special education teacher, a regular education teacher (at the student’s assigned grade), and a representative of the Local Education Agency (school system).  The student is a required member of the IEP team when their transition to adulthood is being discussed. In addition to this bare-bones requirement, there are others who can or must be invited under varying circumstances.

Whenever evaluation results are being discussed, the IEP team should include individuals who are qualified to interpret those evaluation results and the educational implications of them for the child.  Most parents can read evaluation reports with some degree of understanding, but the IEP team needs input from individuals who are in a position to connect the dots and make sense of the various pieces of information available when an evaluation has been conducted.

When children are aging out of the Infant-Toddler Program and are being considered for eligibility for Preschool services, the Child Service Coordinator or previous service providers can be invited to the IEP meeting.    If you want to have your child’s Service Coordinator or others attend an IEP meeting, invite them directly yourself because the school system may not automatically send them an invitation.

At an annual review when the IEP is being totally re-written (rather than amended), all of the people who are currently providing special education services to the child will normally be invited to the meeting.  Sometimes a related service provider (e.g. speech, occupational or physical therapist) will submit written information and some proposed goals when they are unable to attend an IEP meeting.  If you feel that it is important that specific school system staff members (regular education teachers, clinicians, administrators, classroom assistants, etc.) participate in the IEP team discussion, communicate that to the person who is coordinating the meeting so that they are invited and the meeting scheduled at a time when they can attend.

In addition to the required IEP team members, the school system and the parent each have the right to invite others who they feel can contribute to the IEP process.  Individuals who have particular knowledge of the child or specific expertise can be involved upon request.  For example, grandparents, Sunday School teachers, tutors, behavior specialists, psychologists, individuals who have disability-specific information, or private service providers can become invited members of a child’s IEP team.   These individuals can either attend in person, submit written input, or participate via conference call or another technology-supported means.

When your child’s next IEP meeting is being planned, communicate with the meeting coordinator to make sure the all of the right people are at the table to create an educational program that effectively addresses your child’s unique educational needs.

Can there be too much help with homework?

Homework is a fact of life for most students from 1st grade to high school graduation.  It is intended to be an opportunity to practice newly acquired skills, review what has already been learned, and apply or extend instruction beyond the classroom.  If the homework is appropriate for a student, they should be able to complete their work with very limited assistance from their parents.  Parents are expected to show an interest in their child’s education and monitor their homework as well as the class work and tests that are sent home.  They should make sure that the child has a reasonably quiet workspace and needed school supplies.  Many parents will find it necessary to either prompt their child to get started on their homework, or ask them if they have already done it.  What they should not do is take over the assignment and end up doing most of the work themselves!

I will occasionally hear a parent use the word “we” in away that makes it quite clear that they are way too involved in their child’s schoolwork.  “We studied for this test…”, “We do homework for __ hours every night”, “We don’t understand the assignment,” “We are taking Algebra I,” etc.   I sometimes challenge the parent to think about whether their excessive involvement is actually against the child’s best interest.  Here are a few things to consider:

  • Helping too much may keep the child from learning how to function more independently.  Ask yourself:  Am I teaching my child that he must have the full attention of an adult at all times? Can my child learn to use a textbook, dictionary or computer to look something up, rather than just asking me question after question? Can my child read the directions for themselves instead of handing me the paper with the expectation that I will explain, demonstrate and/or guide them step-by-step through the entire assignment?  Does my child even attempt to do work on their own, or have they completely accepted that they “can’t do it.”
  • Helping too much may mask the actual challenges that the child is having.  The teacher who sees correctly completed homework coming back to school everyday won’t know that you spend 3 hours each night re-teaching everything, or pretty much giving your child the answers to the questions.  This keeps important information about the student’s learning from being available to guide instruction.  It could also lead to educators concluding that the child is “doing fine” when you ask the school to provide extra assistance or evaluate the child for special education services.
  • Helping too much may lead to unrealistic expectations.  The student may end up being placed in classes that are too difficult for them when they could possibly be more independently successful  in a class that moved at a slower pace or required a more manageable number of work products.  The student may feel pressure to get all A’s and B’s when they are really just an average kid who would probably earn mostly C’s under normal circumstances.    A student who has been “helped” all the way through school may set (or be pushed toward) unobtainable career goals, unless the parent plans to go to law or medical school with them.  And then what?  Instead, each child should get the message that, as long as he is doing his best, that he is good enough!
  • By trying to protect your child from failure, you may also cheat her from experiencing her own success.  It seems that some parents are afraid that their child will be traumatized by getting a low grade, turning in an unimpressive product, or having to tell a teacher that they had trouble with an assignment.  They forget that some risk and struggle is often necessary for growth and the ability to overcome adversity.  Making things appear to be okay is not the same as developing real competence.

There is much value and satisfaction gained when a person can say that their achievements, great and small, were truly the result of their own efforts!

How to use school system websites

There is a lot of useful information on school and school system websites, but sometimes it is difficult to find exactly what you are looking for.   Some websites are definitely more user-friendly than others.  I’ll share some basic “how to” suggestions that I personally use.  In order to save space, I will use LEA (Local Education Agency) to refer to school systems.

Working with families of children with special needs, we frequently suggest that a parent share their concerns with someone in the central office of the LEA’s Special Education Department.  On the Home page for the LEA’s website, there is usually a tab near the top of the page, or an option listed on the menu located on the left side of the webpage, that will allow you to select “Departments” by clicking on that word.  That should give you an alphabetical listing of the various school system departments.  Most North Carolina LEAs, have an “Exceptional Children” (EC) department, but some call it “Special Education.”  If you don’t find one title, check under the other one.

When you click on EC, you will usually go to a page that will offer general information or an overview of the EC Department and the services provided to students.  Somewhere on that webpage, there may also be a list of staff, with job titles and contact information.  If you don’t see one, look for an option to click on that says something like “staff directory”, “contact information”, or  “staff contacts.”  Larger  school systems tend to have more staff, so there may be Behavior Specialists,  Program Manager/Specialist for specific disabilities, EC Zone Coordinators, or perhaps Program Managers for Preschool, Elementary, Middle or High Schools.  There will always be a Director who oversees all special education services for the entire school system, although the job titles vary a bit.

The department list can lead you to other information as well.  Information about the general education program and graduation requirements can usually be found under “Curriculum and Instruction.”  School system policies, such as the Code of Conduct (discipline guidelines), are often found under the heading of “School Board” or “Board of Education.”  Information about Schools, Transportation and Student/Pupil Assignment can be found under those headings.  If you can’t find what you are looking for on a menu, tab or department list, try entering that topic in the “Search” box that can usually be found near the top of the website Home page.  The Home page should also have a general telephone number for the LEA, most often located near the top or bottom of the page.  Calling that number should allow someone to direct your call to the right place, based on what you tell them.

It might be a good idea to visit the website of your child’s school and the one for the LEA before there is an urgent need, so that you can get familiar with what’s available and how things are organized.  If you don’t use computers very much, it may be helpful to have a student or another person assist you.  Most young people who have grown up with the internet take to it like a duck to water.  It’s time to start getting your feet wet!

Is that a question? Communication tips for parents

Parents generally contact ECAC when things are not going well with their child’s education.  Ineffective communication is often a part of their frustration.  Today we will look at the use of questions versus statements.  The distinction between the two is usually taught in first grade, but as an advocate for your child, it is important to know when it is better to choose one over the other.  This is especially important during parent-teacher conferences or IEP meetings.

Don’t ask a question when you are trying to tell someone something.  I often share the story about a meeting that I had with my son’s 3rd grade teacher after weeks of spending entire evenings struggling with him over homework.  My son has ADHD and a learning disability in writing, and it took him three times as long to get work completed.  Evenings had become miserable for both of us.  After meeting with the teacher and learning that she expected the average child in her class to spend 45 minutes to an hour completing homework, I told her that we were going to spend no more than two hours on homework from that date on.  The madness had to stop, so I did not give her an option.

Sometimes parents really want something to happen for their child and they ask ” can we…”, “how do you feel about…”  and other questions, when they could more effectively make statements such as, “Michael needs…” or “I think it would work better if…”.  There is a place for the other approach, but if you have already made up your mind about something, it’s okay to be more assertive with your communication.  Asking questions in a certain way gives people the opportunity to say “no”, and you don’t want to do that if “no” is not acceptable.

On the flip side, there are times when parents are seeking information, but they make statements that don’t require a useful response.  A statement that, “I don’t see why…” might sound like a request for an explanation, but it leaves enough room for other participants in the conversation to treat it like it was a personal observation that could be acknowledged without further comment.  Asking the question, “why…?” has a much better chance of producing more information or greater insight.  It’s hard for people to ignore a direct question without appearing to be rude.  Don’t forget to ask follow-up questions if more detail is needed.

The bottom line is to not expect other people to read your mind, or to  know what you “mean”.  Say what you mean and ask for the information that you want to get.  Re-word and try again if necessary.  That’s a whole lot better than being ineffective and feeling frustrated.

Did you get that?

Using IEP Progress Reports

Parents of children with disabilities who have an Individualized Education Program, or IEP, should receive reports on their child’s progress toward meeting their IEP goals at least as often as report cards are issued.  The IEP team can require more frequent progress reports if appropriate, and document that decision on the IEP itself.  Many parents, however, are not quite sure what to do with the progress reports when they get them.

Some school systems, or good teachers operating on their own, do a great job of providing details about the child’s developing skills, continuing struggles and even some insight as to the strategies that they are using. Other progress reports are perfect examples of minimalism.  There will be a single letter such as a “P” to indicate that “the student is making progress at a sufficient rate to reach the IEP goal” or a “T” to indicate that “progress is limited due to more time needed.”  When the progress reports are adequately detailed, there may not be a lot of clarification needed.  When the report contains only letter codes, there will almost always be a need for some sort of follow up in order for the parent to get the information that they need to effectively participate in their child’s education.

Additional information can be obtained in a variety of ways.  Parents can request a conference with the teacher, during which they can view work samples and materials used for instruction.  Seeing the classroom setting may also be helpful to understanding why their child is responding or behaving in a certain way (good or bad).  For example, after noticing that the place where my son’s 1st grade class did “circle time” was right next to the classroom computers, it was quite clear to me why the teacher was having difficulty keeping his mind focused on the lesson and hands off the computers.

Parents can also request a telephone conference to get more information from the teacher and ask any questions that they might have, or perhaps exchange email messages to accomplish the same thing.  Most teachers will understand that requesting more information is simply a way for you to better understand what’s going on with your child’s education and how you can best support your child’s learning.

After gathering information, parents should ask themselves (and maybe the teacher) whether the child’s progress is satisfactory. 

If the IEP goals truly reflected what the team thought the child could reasonably be expected to do by the target date, there should be evidence/data that they are on pace to achieve those goals.  If progress is slower than expected, there should be some discussion about why that may be, and whether changes should be made in terms of instructional strategies, supports or services (type, amount, frequency, location, delivery, etc).  Those changes could require the involvement of the whole IEP team, or sometimes a change can be implemented for a trial period before determining that it should be documented on the IEP.

In any event, IEP progress reports, and any supplemental information, are intended to serve as a guide for parents and the rest of the IEP team.  They are an important tool to help insure that the child is receiving adequate benefit from his or her educational program.  Tools have no value if they are left unused.